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Shakespeare's Stories: Twin Masks

For the final two posts of 'Shakespeare's Stories', we visit Hall’s Croft, which is displaying items relating to The Comedy of Errors.

Mask worn by one of the twins in ‘The Comedy of Errors’ in 1962 (Image courtesy of the Royal Shakespeare Company)
Mask worn by one of the twins in 'The Comedy of Errors' in 1962 (Image courtesy of the Royal Shakespeare Company)

Why, here begins his morning story right:
These two Antipholus’, these two so like,
And these two Dromios, one in semblance -
Besides his urging of her wreck at sea.
These are the parents to these children,
Which accidentally are met together.
(The Comedy of Errors Act 5, Scene i)

For our blog series on the new ‘Shakespeare’s Stories’ exhibition, we have so far looked at The Tempest in the Shakespeare Centre next to Shakespeare’s birthplace, and Twelfth Night in the Royal Shakespeare Company’s Swan Bar. For the final two posts we visit Hall’s Croft, which is displaying items relating to The Comedy of Errors. ‘Shakespeare’s Stories’, which is part of the RSC’s World Shakespeare Festival for London 2012, explores the themes of home, identity and journey across these three venues in Stratford-upon-Avon.

The partnership exhibition between the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust and the Royal Shakespeare Company was curated by storyteller Jan Blake, who is in Hall’s Croft looking at the story of the twins in The Comedy of Errors.

‘Shakespeare’s Stories’ can be seen as part of a visit to Hall’s Croft until the end of December 2012 .